Minneapolis Institute of Art

Contact Information

Rates

  • Free admission to museum, and small charge to some special exhibitions.

About

More Information

Directions

  • Located at 24th Street & 3rd Avenue South

Other Date Information

  • Tuesay, Wednesday, and Saturday 10am-5p, Thursday & Friday 10am-9pm, Sunday 11am-5pm, closed Monday. Also closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and July 4.

Attraction Attributes

  • Accessible to Disabled
  • Can Accommodate Groups of 45 or more

Find Nearby

Find Results

Find:

Distance

{{resultsText}}: {{resultCount}}

  1. {{r._source.type_fields.region_name}}

    {{r._source.title}}

    {{r._source.database_fields.address1}}
    {{r._source.database_fields.address2}}
    {{r._source.database_fields.city}}, {{r._source.database_fields.state}} {{r._source.database_fields.postalcode}}
    Call: {{r._source.database_fields.phone1}}
    Call: {{r._source.database_fields.phone2}}

    {{r._source.database_fields.searchtext || r._source.database_fields.printabledescription}}

  2. No Results

    There are no nearby attractions, accommodations, restaurants, or events. Try increasing the distance of your search.

Events

  1. A History of Photography from Mia’s Collection

    2400 3rd Ave S
    Minneapolis, MN 55404
    Call: (612) 870-3000
    Toll Free: (888) 642-2787

    This exhibition presents a brief history of photography through selections from Mia’s collection of 12,500 photographs. Acting as “windows” on scenes that likely would have remained unseen without the benefits of photographic technology, the images reflect the medium’s ability to turn the familiar or hidden into unfamiliar, thought-provoking, evocative, and even iconic moments. Challenging a linear history of photography that began in the 1820s, this collection suggests the timelessness and timeliness of the images’ subjects as well as the global transmission and dissemination of the medium.

  2. A World of Radiant Awakening: Buddhism and the Painting of China

    2400 3rd Ave S
    Minneapolis, MN 55404
    Call: (612) 870-3000
    Toll Free: (888) 642-2787

    Buddhism has been a dominant religious and intellectual force in China since it arrived from India around 100 C.E. Both literati and professional artists created Chinese Buddhist paintings.

    Literati painters, scholars for whom painting was a form of intellectual and moral cultivation, created meditative scenes by incorporating Buddhist ideas into landscape painting. For painters who followed Chan (Zen) Buddhism, the expressive handling of ink evoked the sudden awareness that comes in moments of insight.

    Professional artists generally focused on figurative paintings, including depictions of buddhas, bodhisattvas (nearly enlightened beings that stay on earth to help people), arhats (the original followers of the Buddha), and eminent monks. During the Qing dynasty (1644­–1911), the imperial patronage of esoteric Buddhism—the primary school of Tibetan Buddhism—resulted in a vast number of religious works in the Tibetan style. These paintings combine Tibetan attention to iconographic detail with Chinese-inspired decorative elements.

  3. Aliza Nisenbaum

    2400 3rd Ave S
    Minneapolis, MN 55404
    Call: (612) 870-3000
    Toll Free: (888) 642-2787

    In her painting practice, New York-based artist Aliza Nisenbaum (b. 1977, Mexico City) questions various modes of representing the complex flow of people, money, and things in a globalized world. With the intention of probing a politics of representation, the artist will embark on a three-month-long residency in Minneapolis to connect with and depict members of the Phillips and Whittier communities surrounding Mia.

    The artist will host a neighborhood portrait studio, in which she gets to know the families and groups she will paint through the hours they spend together. The artist views paying attention to her sitters as a form of ethics, investigating the social and economic relationships that exist between these historically underrepresented and underserved communities and the city’s cultural institutions. The residency will culminate in an exhibition—the artist’s first solo museum show—presenting three new large-scale group portraits alongside photo and video documentation of their making.

  4. Boundless Peaks: Ink Paintings by Minol Araki

    2400 3rd Ave S
    Minneapolis, MN 55404
    Call: (612) 870-3000
    Toll Free: (888) 642-2787

    Renowned as an industrial designer, Minol Araki (1928–2010) was also a prolific painter with a firm grounding in East Asian painting traditions. Born in China to Japanese parents, and active professionally in New York and Taipei, Araki created an immense body of ink paintings that reimagined tradition and straddled East and West.

    This exhibition is organized around five mid-career, large-scale works—monumental compositions, each of which stretches more than 70 feet—depicting landscapes, dragons, snow monkeys, and lotus ponds. Each painting is complemented by early and late works that marry influences as disparate as the eccentric Chinese painter Bada Shanren (c. 1626–1705), the Lithuanian-American artist Ben Shahn (1898–1969), Araki’s mentor, the renowned Chinese traditionalist painter Zhang Daqian (1899–1983), and medieval Japanese Zen painters.

  5. Children in Paris: The Birthday Boy and Friends

    2400 3rd Ave S
    Minneapolis, MN 55404
    Call: (612) 870-3000
    Toll Free: (888) 642-2787

    Children became a popular subject in French art in the 1880s and 1890s. Their youthful faces and childhood innocence, along with the daily routines of caring for them, attracted some of the greatest artistic talents of the period. This focused exhibition presents works on paper with children as their subject, by Cassatt, Renoir, Lepère, and others.

    A highlight is a series of prints depicting Robert Besnard (1881–1914), the birthday boy in Mia’s beloved masterpiece by John Singer Sargent, The Birthday Party, exhibited nearby. In seven prints in Mia’s collection by Albert Besnard, Robert’s father, we watch the boy grow up. In one he is a fashionable toddler walking in the park; a year later he is sipping hot chocolate in his mother’s bedroom. At age 7 he is old enough to have a donkey. The etchings offer a rare document of a century-old boyhood, and they also suggest a new date for Sargent’s painting.

  6. Embroidering an Ordered Cosmos: Chinese Daoist Priest Garments of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)

    2400 3rd Ave S
    Minneapolis, MN 55404
    Call: (612) 870-3000
    Toll Free: (888) 642-2787

    Daoist belief emphasizes an ordered cosmos, harmonious existence with nature, and heavenly paradise. Together with Confucianism and Buddhism, it is one of China’s three major belief systems. Daoism emerged after 100 CE and soon acquired the trappings of organized religion: a supreme god, a set of scriptures, temples, priests, and ritual practices.

    Robes worn by Daoist priests represent some of the richest embroidered decoration in Chinese clothing. They take two basic forms: a square, full-length, sleeveless robe with center-front opening (jiangyi), and a full-length, sleeved garment with center-front opening fastened with ties (daopao). Elaborate symbolic schemes are common to both. They feature cosmic diagrams representing paradise; the sun and moon; phoenixes (birds with fiery feathers); abstract forms of China’s five sacred mountains; and circles containing 12 zodiac animals. When priests wore robes like these, they were symbolically united with the cosmos and able to go beyond the earthly and heavenly realms.

  7. Hard Bodies: Contemporary Japanese Lacquer Sculpture

    2400 3rd Ave S
    Minneapolis, MN 55404
    Call: (612) 870-3000
    Toll Free: (888) 642-2787

    It’s an art nearly as old as civilization itself. Since the Neolithic era, artisans in East Asia have coated bowls, cups, boxes, baskets, and other utilitarian objects with a natural polymer distilled from the sap of the rhus verniciflua, known as the lacquer tree. Lacquerware was—and still is—prized for its sheen, a lustrous beauty that artists learned to accentuate over the centuries with inlaid gold, silver, mother-of-pearl, and other precious materials.

    Since the late 1980s, this tradition has been challenged. A small but enterprising circle of lacquer artists have pushed the medium in entirely new and dynamic directions by creating large-scale sculptures, works that are both conceptually innovative and superbly exploitive of lacquer’s natural virtues. Thirty works by 16 artists comprise the first-ever comprehensive exhibition of contemporary Japanese lacquer sculpture. They have all been drawn from the Clark Collections at Mia, the only collection in the world to feature this extraordinary new form.

  8. Joe Sinness

    2400 3rd Ave S
    Minneapolis, MN 55404
    Call: (612) 870-3000
    Toll Free: (888) 642-2787

    Opening reception: Thursday, July 20, 6 to 9 p.m.
    Artist talk: Thursday, September 21, 7 p.m.

    Sexual desire and cinematic performance are filtered through the genres of still-life and portraiture in Joe Sinness’s body of work. For his MAEP exhibition, Sinness captures the beauty of communities traditionally viewed as aberrant.

    Juxtaposing portraits, still-lifes, theatrical sculptures, and cinematic panoramas, Sinness’s works display the performance of sexual desire. Drawing inspiration from models he found using Grindr and Scruff, vintage physique magazines, and iconic films like Cruising, starring Al Pacino, Sinness visualizes desire and pursues a vision of utopic queer spaces and characters—portraying his subjects as tender and worthy of desire.

    Sinness received his BA from St. John’s University and an MFA from Minneapolis College of Art and Design. He was part of a group MAEP exhibition in 2010. The artist is a recipient of the 2013 Artist Initiative Grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board, 2013/14 McKnight Artist Fellowship for Visual Artists, and 2015 Fire Island Artist Residency.

    This exhibition is part of the Minnesota Artists Exhibition Program, now located in U.S. Bank Gallery.

  9. migration (empire)

    2400 3rd Ave S
    Minneapolis, MN 55404
    Call: (612) 870-3000
    Toll Free: (888) 642-2787

    In migration (empire), artist Doug Aitken explores the complex relationship between America’s wilderness and its sprawling built environment. Images of vast landscapes, roadside motels, and industrial cityscapes from every region of the country move across the screen, calling to mind the migration of settlers across the great expanse of land. Unexpectedly, the protagonists of Aitken’s meditative exploration are neither frontiersmen nor actors, but native North American animals. Confined in the sterile environment of motel rooms, the animals cautiously explore the unfamiliar habitat; their displacement from the native environment yields scenes that are at once humorous and horrific, familiar yet prophetic. The work captures the country’s strengths and contradictions—the sublime beauty of a landscape that is often marred by manmade interventions, and the national ambition to expand, which brings both opportunity and loss. Ultimately, migration (empire) provides a picture of America as it grows, changes, and finds its place in the 21st century.

  10. New Pictures: The Propeller Group, Reincarnations

    2400 3rd Ave S
    Minneapolis, MN 55404
    Call: (612) 870-3000
    Toll Free: (888) 642-2787

    This exhibition will show The Living Need Light, The Dead Music (2014), a film by The Propeller Group, a Ho Chi Minh City–based artist collective. The film will be accompanied by an installation of objects selected by the collective from Mia’s Asian, African, Classical, and Native American collections, as well as new objects recently created by the collective. The exhibition invokes connections between cultures and their spiritual relics and rituals, centering on the relationship between the living and the dead, and the spaces created by the living to honor the dead.

  11. Now Where Were We?

    2400 3rd Ave S
    Minneapolis, MN 55404
    Call: (612) 870-3000
    Toll Free: (888) 642-2787

    What if an art installation bent the rules? What if it questioned the norms of museum practice by replacing its traditional white walls with colorful murals? Or combined artworks not because they came from the same time or place, but because, together, they spoke to universal themes of human existence: people, places, and things?

    Artist Dave Muller asks these questions in Now Where Were We?, his temporary re-installation of Mia’s contemporary art galleries. Muller collaborated with Mia’s staff to explore its vast collection, selecting and combining artworks from very different times and places. He then integrated them into the new visual context of his hand-painted murals. Muller’s extensive music collection streams through a listening station in the galleries, adding to the eclectic atmosphere. We hope you’ll consider these artworks in a new way, beyond their original time and place, and join in the conversations that arise from this new configuration.

    Generous support for Now Where Were We? is provided by the Mary Ingebrand-Pohlad Charitable Foundation.

  12. Piranesi: Rome in Ruins

    2400 3rd Ave S
    Minneapolis, MN 55404
    Call: (612) 870-3000
    Toll Free: (888) 642-2787

    Giovanni Battista Piranesi takes us on a ramble through the ruins of ancient Rome. His etchings of the remains of a great civilization couple his archaeological interest in detail with his flair for dramatic effect. This intimate exhibition invites you to reflect on a quiet world of grand desolation. Seen through the lens of the mid-1700s, the ruins suggest romance, mystery, melancholy, awesome possibility, and loss.

Trails & Byways

Next Steps