Minnesota History Center

Contact Information

Rates

  • Fees: $12 adults, $10 seniors, veterans/active mlitary, and college students, and $6 ages 5-17, free age 4 and under and MNHS members. Museum admission is free Tuesdays 3-8 p.m. Library use is free to the public.

About

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Directions

  • One block NE of the Cathedral of St. Paul at Kellogg and John Ireland Blvds. On-site parking ($5). GPS: 44.9482,-93.1054

Other Date Information

  • Open Tues 10 am -8 pm, Wed-Sat 10 am-5 pm, Sun noon–5 pm. Open Monday holidays year-round.

Attraction Attributes

  • Accessible to Disabled
  • Can Accommodate Groups of 45 or more

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Events

  1. "How to Have Fun in a Civil War" Performance & Discussion

    "How to Have Fun in a Civil War" Performance & Discussion

    345 Kellogg Blvd W
    St Paul, MN 55102
    Call: (651) 259-3000

    In this autobiographical multimedia piece, Ifrah Mansour explores Somalia's civil war through the eyes of a seven-year-old girl. Layering poetry, puppetry, video, and interviews, Mansour confronts violent history with humor, offering all Minnesotans a chance to reach across differences for hope and healing.

    Performances will be followed by a talk-back session with the artist. Ifrah Mansour is a Somali multimedia artist, performer, and teacher in Minneapolis, who uses art to bridge cultures and generations. Her work has been seen at the State Fair and Northern Spark festival. "How to Have Fun in a Civil War" was previously mounted at the Guthrie Theater and the Children's Theatre Company.

    This performance is best enjoyed by ages 6 and up. Performances made possible by a 2018 Knight Challenge Grant.

  2. "Somalis + Minnesota" Exhibit

    "Somalis + Minnesota" Exhibit

    345 Kellogg Blvd W
    St Paul, MN 55102
    Call: (651) 259-3000

    From artists to elected officials to teachers and other professionals, members of the Somali community shape--and are shaped by--the fabric of daily life in Minnesota. This exhibit will showcase the history of the first Somali immigrants who arrived in Minnesota in the 1960s and their community today, highlighting their culturally rooted values like hospitality, family bonds and interdependence. This exhibit is being developed in partnership with the Somali Museum of Minnesota.

  3. History Forum: The Founding Fathers & the Origins of Gun Control

    History Forum: The Founding Fathers & the Origins of Gun Control

    345 Kellogg Blvd W
    St Paul, MN 55102
    Call: (651) 259-3000

    The popular History Forum lecture series returns to the Minnesota History Center in October. Join six national scholars as they explore the history that might help us understand and unravel the issues we face right now.

    In December, join historian Saul Cornell for a presentation about the Founding Fathers and the origins of gun control in the United States.

    Today Americans are deeply divided over the Second Amendment. Some passionately assert that the amendment protects an individual's right to own guns. Others feel it does no more than protect the right of states to maintain militias.

    The Founders understood the right to bear arms as neither an individual nor a collective right, but as a civic right - an obligation citizens owed to the state to arm themselves so that they could participate in a well-regulated militia. The modern debate has its roots in the 19th century, during America's first and now largely forgotten gun violence crisis, when the earliest gun control laws were passed and the first cases on the right to bear arms came before the courts and helped create our current impasse over guns.

    Saul Cornell is chair of American history at Fordham University and author of A Well-Regulated Militia: The Founding Fathers and the Origins of Gun Control.

  4. History Forum: The History of Fake News in the US

    History Forum: The History of Fake News in the US

    345 Kellogg Blvd W
    St Paul, MN 55102
    Call: (651) 259-3000

    The popular History Forum lecture series returns to the Minnesota History Center for its 2018-2019 season. Join six national scholars as they explore the history that might help us understand and unravel the issues we face right now.

    In January 2019, join historian Michelle Nickerson for a presentation about the centuries-long history of fake news in the United States.

    The history of partisan media in America stretches back to the partisan newspapers of the early republic through the sensationalized yellow journalism of the Gilded Age. Americans did not start demanding accuracy from news until the 20th century, when influential citizens grew tired of their privacy being violated by muckrakers and tabloid writers, and journalists established their first code of ethics.

    Over the 20th century, elite newspapers like The New York Times became national civic institutions critical to the understanding of our national community. However, the recent rise of cable news and social media in the midst of the modern culture wars created a new kind of partisan news in which "truth" and "fact" remain elevated standards to which journalists and politicians both lay claim.

    Michelle Nickerson is a professor of history at Loyola University-Chicago.

  5. History Forum: The Myth of the Religious Founding

    History Forum: The Myth of the Religious Founding

    345 Kellogg Blvd W
    St Paul, MN 55102
    Call: (651) 259-3000

    The popular History Forum lecture series returns to the Minnesota History Center for its 2018-2019 season. Join six national scholars as they explore the history that might help us understand and unravel the issues we face right now.

    Join historian Steven K. Green for a presentation on the myth of Christian America.

    Among the most enduring themes in American history is the idea that the United States was founded as a Christian nation. This myth arose out of three critical moments in our national past: the Puritan founding of New England; the American Revolution, and the early 19th century, when a second generation of Americans sought to redefine and reconcile the memory of the founding with their religious and patriotic aspirations. Fostered by Americans both famous and ordinary for nearly 400 years, the persistent mythos of a religious founding has become the central concept of our nation for many and the shared story that gives a deeper meaning, however false, to our collective national identity.

    Green is professor of history and of law at Willamette University and author of Inventing a Christian America: The Myth of the Religious Founding.

  6. History Forum: The US & Russia, 1917 to 2017

    345 Kellogg Blvd W
    St Paul, MN 55102
    Call: (651) 259-3000

    The popular History Forum lecture series returns to the Minnesota History Center for its 2018-2019 season. Join six national scholars as they explore the history that might help us understand and unravel the issues we face right now.

    Join historian David C. Engerman for a presentation on the story of the United States and Russia from 1917 to 2017.

    For more than a century, Americans have used Russia as a canvas on which to project their own dreams and nightmares. Both nations emerged onto the international stage in the early 20th century, but diverged onto dramatically different paths during WWI when the US positioned itself as the beacon of international democracy and Russia pursued revolutionary communist social change.

    Some Americans found inspiration in the revolutionary era. Others celebrated Soviet education, economic planning, and gender equality, even as the USSR made the dramatic shift from World War II ally to Cold War adversary. And throughout the 20th century, all opponents saw in Russia was what they feared within the United States: mob rule and an inverted social order. This tumultuous history continues to shape our perceptions of Russia today.

    David C. Engerman is professor of history at Yale University.

  7. History Lounge: The Somali World & Minnesota

    History Lounge: The Somali World & Minnesota

    345 Kellogg Blvd W
    St Paul, MN 55102
    Call: (651) 259-3000

    Since the late 1970s, political turmoil has forced many Somali people to migrate to places as varied as South Africa, Sweden, the United Arab Emirates, and Minnesota.

    Hear from Dr. Cawo Abdi, professor of sociology at the University of Minnesota and author of Elusive Jannah: The Somali Diaspora and a Borderless Muslim Identity, about the history of the global diaspora that connects Minnesota to a larger Somali world. Find out more about the consequences this migration has had for Somali people and how refugees have navigated their lives and dealt with challenges and opportunities in their new homes.

  8. The 1968 Exhibit

    The 1968 Exhibit

    345 Kellogg Blvd W
    St Paul, MN 55102
    Call: (651) 259-3000

    The social forces that swirled through the turbulent 1960s crested in 1968. It was a turning point for a generation coming of age and a nation at war. This popular exhibit returns to Minnesota after touring the nation.

    This exhibit is created by the Minnesota Historical Society, in partnership with the Atlanta History Center, the Chicago History Museum and the Oakland Museum of California.

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