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Get Pumped for Bike Month With a Minnesota Bike Trip

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Two cyclists on the Gitchi Gami State Trail adjacent to Lake Superior / Waqar Ahmad
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Get Pumped for Bike Month With a Minnesota Bike Trip

By Brian Fanelli

Established in 1956 by the League of American Bicyclists, Bike Month has a simple premise: ride a bike more often during May, and encourage your friends to do the same.

The month's flagship events are National Bike to Work Week and Bike to Work Day, occurring respectively on the third week and third Friday of May. And in communities across Minnesota, bicycling advocacy groups host encouragement events all month to get more people bike commuting.

But we all know that work isn’t everything. Often it's just the filler between bike rides.

So this Bike Month, once your legs have warmed up from biking to work, we think you deserve a rambling two-wheeled weekend (or week-long) adventure for good behavior! We hope you ride somewhere you’ve never been; that your family goes bike camping together; and that you climb some big hills and reward yourself with a post-ride beer afterwards.

To get you started, here are a few ideas for a Minnesota bike adventure this May.

Megan and Steve on the Bobsled trail in Cuyuna

Megan and Steve take on the flowing Bobsled trail in Cuyuna / Pinkbike

Establish Your Basecamp for Adventure at Cuyuna

The unmistakable, craterous and red Cuyuna landscape was forged from 70 years of iron ore mining, a long-time specialty here in northern Minnesota. But after the mines closed, Cuyuna sat dormant for over three decades – abandoned like so many other former industrial sites. In the years since, nature has worked to reclaim the area’s Mars-like topography: Water has filled the pits, and trees have once again rooted on the rugged landscape. In other words, perfect conditions for mountain biking.

Rehabilitated as the Cuyuna Country State Recreation Area in 2011, the post-industrial landscape was transformed into a world-class adventure destination with more than 25 miles of purpose-built mountain bike trails ranging from moderate to extremely difficult. Several loops of singletrack were carved into the rocky terrain, circling mine lakes, winding through woods and over steep hills. Elevated areas offer outstanding views of the landscape’s many mine lakes and natural lakes. More than 20 miles of trails are groomed for winter fat biking, which has earned Cuyuna a reputation as one of the country’s premier year-round bicycling destinations.

Like the trails themselves, True North Basecamp offers that perfect blend of old and new, wilderness and Wi-Fi

Cuyuna is also notable for its incredible bike-friendly lodging. Overlooking one of the park’s open pit lakes, True North Basecamp provides a comfortable, trail-connected basecamp for adventure. Bring a tent and camp under the stars, or book one of their famous "north woods industrial" cabins. Each of the six 275-square-foot cabins has one full- and three twin-sized beds, Wi-Fi access, integrated USB charging ports, and temperature control for year-round comfort.

Like the trails themselves, True North Basecamp offers that perfect blend of old and new, wilderness and Wi-Fi.

Skyline at sunrise over Silver Lake Rochester

Rochester at sunrise / AB-Photography.US, courtesy Experience Rochester

Take a Ride in Rochester

Rochester is well known for the world-renowned Mayo Clinic, but bicycling in this scenic southern Minnesota city is anything but clinical. The city’s robust, 85-mile network of bike trails meanders along the winding banks of the Zumbro River, through downtown, and past an assortment of unique, locally owned businesses. Along the way, you’ll discover a city full of world-class urban amenities without the complications, long lines and high costs of a bigger city.

While biking in Rochester, you might come across one of the city’s many trailside vistas of the downtown skyline, a quaint neighborhood coffee shop, or—if you ride long enough—perhaps you’ll stumble across the wild grasses, wetlands and oak savannas found at the most remote edges of the city.

Mesabi Bike Trail near Hibbing

Mesabi Trail

Tour in Comfort With a Lodge-To-Lodge Getaway on the Mesabi Trail

Spend a long weekend exploring northern Minnesota’s scenic Iron Range with a lodge-to-lodge tour on the Mesabi Trail. Built through the heart of the Iron Range, the 120-mile trail is defined by its scenic views of excavated earth and the manmade mountains you’ll cycle across.

Speaking of mountains, the Mesabi Trail is a dream come true for cyclists who are inclined toward inclines. The trail is full of short, rolling hills that climb and descend the steep ridges of the region’s iconic mining pits, delivering incredible Iron Range vistas at the top of every climb.

"This is one of the most beautiful trails we have ever ridden"

The trail starts at Grand Rapids then angles northeast through Colleraine, Keewatin, Chisholm, Mountain Iron and other Iron Range cities before ending in the Hoyt Lakes area. The longest section of continuous trail is from Grand Rapids to Virginia—about 68 miles. "The trail winds over a river, through beautiful wooded areas, and around a couple of lakes," says Ed S. in his TripAdvisor review of the Mesabi Trail. "This is one of the most beautiful trails we have ever ridden."

Maximize your long weekend getaway by having the Mesabi Trail design a lodge-to-lodge tour to suit your style. They’ll help you plan lodging, luggage shuttles, deliver lunches along the trail, and can shuttle you and your bikes back to your vehicle when you’re done. Hosted rides, group rides for up to 25 people, and sag-wagon supported rides are available, too.

Woman holding bike overhead at Mississippi River Headwaters

Begin your epic Mississippi River tour at the headwaters in Itasca State Park

Begin Your Epic Mississippi River Bike Tour

Many great journeys begin humbly, and for people biking the Mississippi River Trail (MRT), the humble headwaters at Itasca State Park are no different: just a shallow stream, ankle-deep and barely moving at all. But as you cycle south along the Mississippi, the small river gradually becomes larger, picks up speed and grows into its awe-inspiring reputation. Although there are many places in Minnesota where you can ride the MRT, the river begins its long journey south at Itasca – and for people biking the river from end-to-end, it’s where your journey begins as well.

From the headwaters, you can choose between two routes: the “Explorer’s On-Road Route” east to Grand Rapids, or south along the Paul Bunyan Trail for the “Family Friendly State Trail Route.” The 200-mile “Explorer’s” route closely follows the river as it snakes through the ancient pine forests of the Mississippi north woods, consisting of predominantly asphalt roads and shoulders, with terrific views of the Mississippi River around every bend. On the flip side, the 100-mile “Family Friendly” route does not follow the river, instead focusing on connecting the many smaller river towns between Bemidji and Brainerd.

Whichever route you choose, road or trail, you’re sure to have an unforgettable time riding the MRT in northwest Minnesota.

Biking around Bde Maka Ska, Minneapolis skyline in background

Pedal your way around the scenic Chain of Lakes near Uptown Minneapolis / Meet Minneapolis

Take the Ultimate Bike Tour of Minneapolis

One of the best things about Minneapolis is how seamlessly its extensive, award-winning park system blends into the cityscape. Quiet parks along the Mississippi riverfront sit next to trendy bars and restaurants in the North Loop, while lakes and creeks fit harmoniously into residential neighborhoods.

And connecting it all is the Grand Rounds: a continuous, 51-mile loop of off-street bike trails throughout the entire city.

Riding the Grand Rounds is as close to a comprehensive Minneapolis bike tour as you'll find. Whether you want beautiful scenery and skyline views, historic sites and museums, or to explore the city's trendiest neighborhoods, you'll find it on the Grand Rounds.

Brian Fanelli

Brian Fanelli is a writer and editor for Explore Minnesota. When he isn't writing about life in The North, you'll find him browsing the sci-fi shelves in a local bookstore, biking one of Minnesota's spectacular trails or walking his Chihuahua around Minneapolis.